Thematic Discussion 3 - Sustainable Development Goals - enough to end the sanitation crisis?


For more information, please visit the discussion on the SuSanA Forum here.

 

Sustainable Development Goals - enough to end the sanitation crisis?

Photo: E. Fabian

The MDGs did not succeed in ensuring everyone has access to safe sanitation- will the new SDG indicators on sanitation increase progress to ensure that everyone has their right to water and sanitation realised?

Despite 15 years of action on the MDGs, the target for sanitation has still not been met. At least 2,3 billion people – one in three people globally – lack access to an improved sanitation facility. Many more lack access to sanitation that is culturally acceptable or affordable. An estimated 1 billion people are still forced to defecate in the open. Soon the SDGs will be adopted, setting a new development agenda for the next 15 years of development. In our discussion we will explore what worked, and what didn’t in the MDG process, and how we can make sure that the SDGs do things differently, so as to prevent the same mistakes of the past. We will also explore how the SDGs will prioritise those most in need, and how civil society will monitor progress to ensure that the needs of the most vulnerable and marginalised are met.

1. Period of Discussion

From Tuesday, 1 September to Monday, 14 September 2015

2. Topics of the Thematic Discussion

  • Theme I – SDG indicators: The MDGs did not succeed in ensuring everyone has access to safe sanitation – will the new SDG indicators on sanitation increase progress to ensure that everyone has their right to water and sanitation realised?

  • Theme 2 – Prioritising those most in need: How do we ensure that the SDGs prioritise, and monitor progress, for those most in need of safe sanitation? How do we ensure that they realise the human right to water and sanitation?

  • Theme 3 – Civil society’s role in monitoring: How can civil society contribute to the monitoring of the goals and targets? What will our role need to be to ensure improvements for all?

  • Theme 4 – Safe versus basic sanitation: What is the difference between ‘basic’ and ‘safe’ sanitation? Why is this important? How do we ensure that we reach those most in need?

3.    Thematic Experts

  • Ramisetty Murali, Convenor: Freshwater Action Network- South Asia (FANSA)
  • Louisa Gosling, Programme Manager for Principles: WaterAid
  • Graham Alabaster, Programme Manager: United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT)
  • Rose Osinde Alabaster, Operations Desk Officer: WaterLex
  • Eddy Perez: Center for Global Safe Water, Sanitation and Hygiene at Emory University (Former Lead Sanitation Specialist, Water and Sanitation Program, World Bank)
  • Tim Brewer, Policy Analyst: WaterAid
  • Martin Gambrill: Lead Water and Sanitation Specialist, Water and Sanitation Program, World Bank
  • Hanna Woodburn: Global Public Private Partnership for Handwashing

Find more information in the announcement here and the forum.